The Value of Loyalty?

Trust in Supply Chain

I would not have known who Ed Catmull was, except for a passage in Steve Jobs’ biography by Walter Isaacson.

Ed was the head of Pixar who repositioned the company from making ultra-high end graphics designing PCs to a company making beautiful stories into animated films using computer graphics.

As the story goes, at one point in his career, Steve was out of Apple and focused on making Pixar succeed as a computer company, while Ed was trying to building Pixar’s film business in parallel.

Disney saw the potential of this technology, and offered Ed a lucrative deal to come and work for them making such films. By all accounts Disney had more clout, and stronger resource platform to help Ed do the most important thing in his life – yet he stuck to Steve Jobs.

As a result Pixar got the contract to make “Toy Story” and, Pixar’s outstanding success gave Steve his second come back into Apple.

The rest is history.

Awed as I am by Jobs’ accomplishments in creating outstanding products using a judicious mix of internal and external resources, his ability to inspire this type of loyalty struck me as extra-ordinary.

In today’s world of transient affiliations, it was even more extra-ordinary.

The value of loyalty is clear – it rebuilt Steve’s career, and built Ed’s career. If you look at most careers carefully, you will discover the value of loyalty built into them.

In one of my next blogs, I will explore “How to Inspire Loyalty?”

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  • Network Market Leader says:

    The value of loyalty is clear – it rebuilt Steve’s career, and built Ed’s career. If you look at most careers carefully, you will discover the value of loyalty built into them.

    I would like to add 4 added tips for aspiring leaders which can increase Locality :
    – Focus on adding value, not gaining followers.
    – Become the person you would choose to follow. Would you follow you?
    – Share your inner best intentions. Authenticity is more compelling than talent, skill, or competence.
    – Honor people. People choose leaders who make them feel they matter.

  • Dannic says:

    The value of loyalty defines the state or quality of being loyal to someone or something faithfulness to commitments or obligation
    Being loyal can overlap being loyal to yourself and to others.

    Being loyal to yourself:
    Being faithful to what you believe is right and not giving up on yourself. Being loyal to yourself is something people always forget about. Not changing who you are because of what someone else says about you is a good way to be loyal to yourself.

    Being loyal to others:
    As the definition says being loyal to others is to follow through with what you say you will do for that person or to a commitment you made to someone else.
    Maybe you have a commitment with another person that includes yourself. You don’t want to break that commitment as it will make you seem disloyal. Loyalty could be the most important value that someone possesses or believes.

  • Cheyenne says:

    Impressive way to increase loyalty and it impacts on the growth of the organizations.

    Being loyal to yourself:
    Being faithful to what you believe is right and not giving up on yourself. Being loyal to yourself is something people always forget about. Not changing who you are because of what someone else says about you is a good way to be loyal to yourself.

    Being loyal to others:
    As the definition says being loyal to others is to follow through with what you say you will do for that person or to a commitment you made to someone else.

  • Marcus says:

    I grew up in a time that saw the decline of loyalty between both directions of employer and employee. When folks are laid off by decisions made “in the rear with the gear” using a spreadsheet rather than analyzing the worth of employees to an organization you know there is no loyalty that the employer feels toward the employee.

    On the other hand employees in my field (IT) found that the only way to increase income and get promoted was to leave one job for another. So much for being loyal to your employer.

    • Dannic says:

      Either loyalty decreased in the companies but still, it is very important towards the growth of the business. From a young age, we’re consistently asked what we may want to do when we grow up – while the answers at that point in our life tend to veer towards the extraordinary (superhero), dangerous (firefighter), or both (astronaut), we’re pre-conditioned to think of a singular job title and position our education around it.

      As adults, we understand that this is just not the case. In a single career, we may face several employers and many different job positions. While we often find ourselves working within the industry we originally set out to be part of, gaining specialized degrees, certifications and training; many people decide to choose a different career path along the way.

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